My Exhibits

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Howdy art lovers! In my last post, I had delved into the nitty gritties of showcasing art, specifically at exhibitions and art shows. It gives me great pleasure to share with you all today my very own and personal experiences related to the art exhibits that I have had the good fortune of being part of.

Even though they were small community exhibits organized within our fraternity, for me they were nothing less than any renowned art show set up by reputed galleries or curators, for the learning associated with these helped me grow as an artist. Moreover, they provided me with the much-needed exposure as well as recognition, not just within my fraternity but beyond!

So, without further ado, let’s plunge right into it!

As I mentioned earlier, two of the exhibits were local community shows, where some of the many talented artists of the fraternity I belong to got together and put up their work on display. Both proved to be great morale boosters for me as not only did I manage to sell some of my work, but also got some custom orders! Here are a few snippets from these exhibits:

The next opportunity that I have had the distinct honor of being a part of is an Online Solo Art Exhibit organized by Google Books Art and Culture, wherein my artwork was approved for global publishing as a Solo Online Exhibit on the prestigious Google Books.

Artist’s Art & Photography solo online Exhibits are published globally on Google Books for lifelong and can be downloaded by Google’s billions of readers for free access on Google Play Books, Google Books Library and Google Android Play Store across the globe in 149 countries. Art Exhibit Google Book is strictly online and no print or hard copy (pdf) is allowed due to copyright protection.

As an artist, publishing my art on the Google Books, Arts & Culture platform carries a great deal of professional weightage and mileage as it helps me share and promote it not just directly to art connoisseurs, collectors, art galleries, museums and prospective art buyers but also onto social media.

Since Google is the world’s largest search engine, publishing my art exhibit on Google’s various platforms, especially Books, has a distinct advantage as my work is indexed by Google itself, which helps in SEO (search engine optimization) and gives me a mileage in getting higher ranks in online search results and better discoverability on social media, thus connecting me with genuine art lovers across the globe and reach out to prospective buyers and art galleries.

One worry I always have when sharing my artwork on online social media platforms or online sites/galleries is that there is no copyright protection and my art can be downloaded or shared illegally. However, Google Books offers all Artists protection under their own copyrights and the book is globally DRM protected for illegal sharing and downloading.

Another advantage is that my artwork is archived in the Google Books Library and helps reach billions of Google’s readers & subscribers across the globe in 149 countries thus connecting me with a global audience! Here are the links to my very own ebook art exhibit with google books:

https://play.google.com/store/books/details?id=fHEUEAAAQBAJ

Do go through them and don’t forget to leave your reviews and star ratings to help my work reach more audiences!

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Exhibiting Your Art

Have you been creating a lot of art lately? Well how about showing it to the world now! One of the best ways to do so is by showcasing your work in art exhibitions as these are the stepping stones of every artist’s career growth. Whether professional or amateur, every artist should take part in art exhibitions. Not only are they a great platform to showcase your work and reach out to potential buyers, but also a means of getting recognition among like-minded artists, peers, patrons and industry experts, thus making some valuable new acquaintances.

However, many people are apprehensive about entering art exhibitions usually due to lack of confidence. But let me assure you, there are exhibitions for all skill levels.

If you are just starting out as an artist you may not want to enter the large scale national portrait exhibitions, but there is no reason you should not enter your local exhibitions which cater to budding and emerging artists like you!

Getting selected by an art gallery means a lot of work needs to be done before you can proudly flaunt your art. This article will hopefully not just inspire you to enter art exhibitions but also help you understand what exactly is involved. So let’s get right into it!

Why should you enter art exhibitions?

  • If you are interested in selling your art, this is how you expose it to people who are interested in buying art and have a sizable budget.
  • You get to meet other artists and art patrons. Some of the artists you meet may become your inspiration in future.
  • You are forced to put your best foot forward with your work. If you are finding yourself producing mediocre work, then signing up to art exhibitions may motivate you to put in your best.
  • You will stop procrastinating in order to meet exhibition deadlines.
  • The chance to win awards can really boost your art career.

What are your options for exhibiting?

The following are the various options available to put your art on display:

  • Solo shows – Whether physical or online, putting on a solo show will give you full control over everything. On the flipside, it will cost you that much more. One alternative to this is to have a show in collaboration with other artists. In case you decide to go in for a solo show, ensure you have enough work to display, not just in terms of quantities, but also a well-curated range.
  • Commercial gallery – Working with galleries can be a daunting task but the advantages include publicity, help with installation costs, and potential future exhibitions. Galleries often present open calls for exhibitions or representation. While these are great opportunities to get your work seen, they can also turn out to be costly so it’s best to avoid applying to every single opportunity, especially if it involves a submission fee. So take only those openings into serious consideration that are relevant to you. Group shows, craft fairs etc. Another way to give exposure to your art is to participate in craft fairs or group shows.
  • Group shows – These can be a great option if you feel you only have a small selection of works to exhibit. The other benefit is that you’ll be able to divide tasks among a group of people so that there are fewer burdens on one individual.  Being part of a group can also widen your network. However, a downside of group shows can be disagreements, especially on the decision making level, if the participants don’t see eye to eye or don’t share similar artistic interests. So make sure you work with like-minded artists whose work can be linked to yours. When it comes to a group exhibit, uniformity is the key.

How much will it cost?

Whether putting up a solo or a group show, it’s a good idea to work out a budget plan. The following aspects need to be taken into consideration:

  • Hiring of exhibit space.
  • Entertaining costs (drinks, eats, etc.)
  • Advertising.
  • Transportation costs.
  • Marketing (posters, flyers, website, etc.)
  • Installation costs.
  • Printing (CVs, press releases, artist statements, business cards, etc.)

Some of these costs can be taken care of if you can manage to get your show sponsored by local companies, etc.

How do you advertise your show?

Spreading the word about your upcoming show is as important as the show itself. Here are a few ways to advertise your exhibition:

  • Social media forums like Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr or even your own blog are a great way to get the word out.
  • Try and get your event listed on popular art events sites.
  • Send “save the date” emails to your mailing list well before the exhibition and then another reminder mail a couple of days before the event.
  • Flyers and posters are a great advertising tool in local area locations like cafes, community centers, etc.
  • Last but not the least, word of mouth. Nothing better than coming straight from the horse’s mouth!

What is the standard procedure to enter an art exhibition?

  • There will be a call to entry providing the set of requirements for the exhibition and the deadlines.
  • You will be asked to submit your most recent artworks, (usually, ones that have been completed within a year of the exhibition).
  • The finalists will be announced on a preset date.
  • If selected as a finalist, you will need to prepare your artworks for the exhibition and deliver them to the exhibition within the provided time frame.
  • There will be an opening night which you can choose to attend. Although you are not required to attend the exhibition in person, but it is recommended you do so.
  • Any sales of your artworks will be handled by the exhibition and you will receive your sale proceeds (minus a commission taken by the organizer).
  • If your artworks do not sell, then you will need to collect them at a certain time and place.

Preparing Your Art for the Exhibition

Selecting an art gallery and confirming an art exhibit is only the first step of a much longer process. Although there are a lot of things that the art gallery handles for you, your personal involvement is of utmost importance as you know your art the best, hence you need to be a part of every decision that is being made about it. Here’s what all you need to look at:

  • Select pieces that are consistent in either concept or themeand bring out your signature style and ideas the best.
  • Click high quality images of these for promotional purposes like catalogues, prints, etc.
  • Pay special attention to giving final touch ups if required by any of your artworks before displaying as well as the framing if the gallery demands so.
  • Another important aspect is the Certificate of Authenticity, which is required for sales.
  • If you are not framing your artworks, you will need to consider how you will display them. In case of stretched canvases, a common practice is to extend the painting over the edges to give it a feeling of continuity. Or you could just paint the edges a flat white or black.
  • Decide how you want your artworks to be hanged.
  • Varnish your artworks if you feel the need, although this is not a mandatory requirement.

Transportation

Ensure your pieces are packed securely to prevent damage during transportation. Dispatch them well in time so that in case of any damage, the gallery will have enough time to repair them.

Preparing your Personal Information

You will need to provide the following details along with your artworks:

  • Personal details.
  • Artist statement and artist profile/CV.
  • Prices of the artworks.
  • Names, medium and dimensions of the artworks.

Your artist statement and artist CV will need to be sent to the gallery for publishing in their catalogues or to be displayed along with your works. Update your CV with all your latest accomplishments. Make sure that your artist statement goes well with the selected works.

Being part of an art exhibition is not just about selling art. It is also a great opportunity to see your work through the eyes of your viewers. However, art is very subjective so be prepared to receive all sorts of opinions, some positive and others negative. The trick is to take the criticism positively and learn from it. This will help you evolve and grow as an artist. Your artistic talent does not need the validation of sales.

I hope this post provides you a better insight into what is involved in entering art exhibitions and inspires you to do so yourself. Please feel free to share any thoughts or tips of your own in the comment section below.

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And the Award Goes to….

Art competitions can provide some great opportunities to artists irrespective of whether they win or not. Not only do they give exposure and present a chance to showcase your work at exhibitions, but also prove to be an excellent morale booster for your art career. This in turn will increase your self-confidence as well as help you evolve and grow as an artist. 

Generally, the selected or shortlisted artists receive recognition, sizeable rewards and some great opportunities to exhibit, promote and/or sell their work. Several competitions often double up as art exhibits where artworks are up for sale, thereby providing artists with a shot at earning money in addition to possibly winning a prize.

The jury in an art competition is usually composed of prominent and well-known personalities from the art world, with considerable amount of experience and a good sense of the current market. This makes art competitions a great means of networking. Prizes are appropriately chosen so as to benefit artists, be it in the form of an opportunity to participate in an exhibition, a cash prize or promotional opportunities.

Winning an art competition is a great achievement as it is another feather that artists can add in their cap and therefore their CV. However, just entering the competition is big in itself as it provides you with recognition as well as a platform to prove yourself and your skill as an artist.

Moreover, entering art competitions can help in proving to yourself that you can be serious about your art. It shows that you are willing to put effort into it, and you think that your art deserves to be recognized more widely.

I consider art competitions integral to my artistic journey, as they help me get the much needed exposure and recognition, which are more important to me than the monetary gains which come in the form of rewards or prizes. It is one such art competition which I entered recently that has given me the much required boost in confidence. The competition was organized by Art Chitrakala, an organization registered with the Government of India. It provides a platform to artists from all over India to showcase, promote as well as sell their art. They organize monthly contests at “All India National Level” wherein the selected winners get an opportunity to get featured on their page and sell their work.

It was an honor and a privilege for me to be able to send my entries for the November 2020 art contest organized by Art Chitrakala, wherein a minimum of 1 and a maximum of 5 artworks had to be sent. I am absolutely thrilled to share with you all that one out the five pieces that I had entered, one was selected for a Consolation Prize! I was also greatly honored to receive the Emerging Artist Award, being one among the 250 winners from all over the country. Here are snapshots of the shortlisted artworks and the respective certificates:

It has been an extremely overwhelming and humbling experience for me to be bestowed upon with these rewards, being my very first. To see my work displayed on the pages of The Art Chitrakala website has helped endorse my faith in myself as an artist. I have been making art for just about ten years now and this has invoked mixed emotions of satisfaction, joy, accomplishment, and personal honor.

 More than the cash prize and the awards, it is the recognition that counts, making the entire experience ever so memorable. This one will always hold a special place in my heart and I’m thankful to Art Chitrakala for providing me with this platform. Winning in this competition has fueled my passion further and inspired me to work harder.

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What Kind of Art Sells?

What themes and subjects sell the most in art? Which mediums and genres sell best? What sizes of paintings sell more – smaller or larger ones? These are some important questions that every artist should be asking when he decides to put his work up for sale.

I like to be sure of what will sell in the art market, even though my personal favorites are conceptual paintings which are a mix of realism as well as abstract art. For me, the true meaning behind what I paint takes precedence over the monetary gains I can obtain from it. However, when it comes to the cash inflow, I make sure I brush up my knowledge about the current art trends.

Today’s post is my endeavor to share with you all my own little nuggets regarding what needs to be considered when selling art. This information is based on my personal experiences hence should not be considered as a benchmark for improving sales.

What are the Best-selling Themes and Subjects in Art?

 

If your favorite subject happens to be among the popular ones, you’re in for luck. Keep in mind that you will sell more if you focus on your strengths rather than painting mediocre versions of something that’s not really your cup of tea. Even though one may not be making art solely to sell it, it may end up happening that way. For instance, an artist located in a tourist set up may find himself painting local scenery and landscapes as they will sell easily, thereby helping him pay his bills.  But this doesn’t stop him from painting what he likes to, in his signature style. Here is a list of some popular themes and subjects that do well commercially in the art market:

  1. Local scenes, landscapes and seascapes (modern, impressionistic or semi-abstract) – Landscape painting is the most popular and common subject for art owing to its versatile nature. Not only do people love looking at a picturesque and scenic panorama, but also like to invest in the visual representation of one, so as to keep reliving its spectacular beauty. Moreover a landscape works well in any type of decor or ambience. So what types of landscapes sell best? Many artists like to depict their local scenery in the form of landmarks, historical events or heritage sites that are exclusively characteristic of their area. Seascapes, harbors, and beach scenes all sell particularly well, probably because of their association with holidays, vacations, and relaxation.
  • Abstract paintings –Most people buy art with the aim to match it with their décor. Abstract art fulfils this requirement hence sells well. An abstract painting can simply be interpreted as a colour, texture, or shape, which helps maintain a certain level of uniformity with the home decoration. Besides this, abstraction has a nonrepresentational or symbolic approach, so its interpretation becomes subject to each individual viewer, thus making it easier to sell.
  • Paintings of dogs, cats and wildlife – People love owning paintings of dogs as much as they love their dogs as a painting of a dog invokes feelings of intimacy and affection, while paintings of wildlife suggest untamed, uninhibited nature. Perhaps for these reasons such paintings do well in the art market.
  • Figure studies and nudes – Whether it is abstract or impressionistic portraits or figure studies, people enjoy looking at images of humans. Although the trend is shifting towards attired rather than bare bodies, there will probably always be a market for nudes.

What sells better – Original Art or Prints?

It has been noticed that prints usually sell better than original works, probably because they are less expensive. And of course many prints are sold as decorative items, as they can be mixed and matched with different colour schemes. Limited-edition prints are more popular than open-edition ones as art buyers somehow seem to find the idea of a controlled supply quite appealing. When an artist put a limit on how many prints he or she will make, it attracts buyers as they feel they are killing two birds with one stone – investing in something that is almost original but less expensive than the original, yet “exclusive” and not entirely mass-produced.

What Medium of Art Sells Best?

Ideally, the following 7 mediums of art sell better than others:

  1. Offset-litho prints (original as well as limited-edition).
  2. Giclée prints (original as well as limited-edition).
  3. Oil and acrylic paintings.
  4. Watercolors.
  5. Artists’ original prints (e.g. etchings and engravings).

 

What Size Painting Sells the Best?

 

The general consensus among most artists is that it is commercially more viable to work on smaller canvases than larger ones as the former are generally priced lower than the latter, so not only do they appeal to buyers for monetary reasons, but also because they take up less space and demand less of an aesthetic instinct. Having said that, it is equally important to take into consideration that the earnings from a large number of smaller paintings might be equal to those obtained from a fewer larger paintings. Hence, most commercially successful artists work with a range of sizes to appeal to a wider audience.

Some artists purposefully create a range of small paintings with a common theme or style as they feel it will encourage buyers to pick up the entire series. Another advantage of working on a smaller scale is that the paintings require less storage space and are easier for the artist to accommodate even if they don’t sell right away.

What is your Target Market?

Target market is a very important factor to be considered when selling art. In order to successfully target a particular buying community, artists need to focus on marketing as well to certain extent. Here are some points to consider depending on the type of buyer you are targeting:

  • If you are selling through a gallery, your art needs to cater to the likes and requirements of its patrons. Highly priced works are best suited for galleries and least for museums and private collectors.
  • Private and commercial buyers usually use art as décor for offices etc, whereas interior decorators and designers will have specific artistic requirements.
  • The pricing of your work will depend on the disposable income as well as the budget of the buyer in question.
  • Home décor primarily depends on low priced copies or prints of originals and thus constitutes the largest market for art.
  • Art can be propagated through product development in various formats like, mugs, postcards, calendars, etc., which is a pretty lucrative market in itself.

 

My Experiences with Sales

I have realized that I can generate better sales for my art when it is displayed in a physical space like a gallery rather than an online virtual space.  The reason behind this could be that my viewers get to experience my work at close quarters, hence are able to appreciate it much more for various elements, especially colors and textures. Moreover, they get a better understanding of the medium, technique and the surface I have used to create the artwork. Most of my paintings are texture-laden and this aspect comes through best when viewed in person.  So if you want to emphasize and highlight the USP of your work, an art show or gallery display would be the best option.

I have also realized that keeping myself abreast with the latest art trends goes a long way as it keeps me updated with what is selling currently in the art market, thereby giving me better returns for my work. When it comes to selling my art, I take the practical approach and paint what’s in demand. But that doesn’t stop me from painting what I like so both go hand and hand for me. The trick is to strike equilibrium between both. In conclusion, I would like to say that success in any commercially aimed artistic undertaking can depend on a combination of all these factors. After all, selling art is no less than any business endeavor , so if you want to make money, treat it like one!

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Can Illustration be Fine Art?

Ever wondered what those caricatures of cows with the scenic backdrop of a farm you see on the milk cartons in the supermarket are? Are they a form of art or illustration? Its images like these that lead us to the age old question – what is the difference between fine art and illustration? This dilemma has been haunting not just artists, but also non artists for centuries.

If you go by the classic definitions, an illustration is a visualization or a depiction, such as a drawing, sketch, painting, photograph, or any other kind of printed version of things seen, remembered or imagined, created by an artist using a graphical representation. It explains, visually represents, or just decorates a written text, which may or may not be of a literary or commercial nature.

On the other hand, fine art is just art for art’s sake. Simply put, an idea, concept or thought brought to life on paper or canvas. In other words, art is the idea itself whereas an illustration is a depiction or explanation of an idea or a story.

Historically, book illustration and magazine/newspaper illustrations have been the predominant forms of this type of visual art, although illustrators have also used their graphic skills in the fields of poster art, advertisements, comic booksanimation art, greeting cards and cartoon-strips.

Most illustrative drawings were done in pen-and-ink, charcoal, or metal point, after which they were replicated using a variety of print processes including: woodcuts, engraving, etching, lithography, photography and halftone engraving, among others.

Today, there are five main types of illustrations: educational “information graphics” (eg. scientific textbooks); literary (eg. children’s books); fantasy games and books; media (magazines, periodicals, newspapers); and commercial (advertising posters, point of sale, product packaging). Many of these illustrations are designed and created using computer graphics software such as Adobe IllustratorPhotoshop, and CorelDraw, as well as Wacom tablets. The traditional methods like watercolors, pastels, casein, egg tempera, wood engraving, linoleum cuts, and pen and ink are also employed even today.

There is an ongoing debate on whether illustration should be categorized as a fine art, an applied art – or even a decorative art. However, looking back in time, one will find innumerable illustrative masterpieces thereby leaving no doubt that this visual art form deserves a place alongside other fine arts like painting and sculpture.

As we glance through the history of art, we realize that during the first 30,000 years of art, artists were able to earn a decent living working for kings, priests, pharaohs and popes and commissioned art for temple walls and public spaces.  It adorned palaces and royal tombs and the homes of aristocrats.  Then monarchs began to disappear and Popes stopped commissioning new art.  The birth of capitalism gave rise to a new commercial class that became the new patrons of art.

The talented artists who once painted the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel adapted themselves to their new clientele by adopting two distinct business models.  The first produced what we now call “fine” or “gallery” art for the private collections of the rich and corporate class.  The second one evolved thanks to the newly invented printing press, wherein instead of selling a painting to a wealthy patron, artists made multiple copies of a piece and sold them for smaller amounts to larger numbers of (less-wealthy) buyers.

Here are a few visuals that show the evolution of art into the field of illustration through time: 

It is this technological development that brought about revolutionary changes in the history of illustration, eventually leading to the creation of the twin pillars of modern day illustration:

  1.  The ability to create and distribute quality reproductions of an artwork to large audiences.
  2.  The ability to collect marginal, proportional payments for that art from large audiences.

These two developments created potential opportunities for talented artists.  They became the core economic model for illustration, and the key distinction between modern illustration and fine art.  Thanks to these developments, the talented masters of art who were once unaffordable under the old business model of art now became accessible to the general public.

One cannot deny the fact that because of its wider audience, illustration is often broader than fine art. But does that mean the commercial angle affects the quality and character of art? In my opinion, broader appeal to a popular audience does not diminish the greatness or quality of art.

I firmly believe that there is a very thin line distinguishing art from illustration and this distinction has nothing to do with the artist’s skill or the quality of the work.  It is equally easy to find examples of illustration that are superior to “fine” art and vice versa.  I feel that the narrative/decorative divide helps us to categorize a piece either as “art” or as “illustration” and every artist is free to exploit this aspect to his or her discretion.

While fine art visually presents an idea as it is in its purest form, an illustration is a form of visual communication or representation which defines a given piece of text. The writing as well as the illustration together explains the concept or idea. This marriage between art and typography can be seen all around us in various forms like packaging of consumer products, children’s’ books, assembly and installation instructions for furniture, electronics etc., and my favorite form of illustration – road maps. Even postcards are a form of illustration! Or would you consider them fine art?

So I leave you to ponder on this and decide for yourself what you would like to put under the category of illustration and what you consider as fine art. Personally for me, any form of communicative expression is art, be it illustrative or not, for every drawing or doodle is a window to a deeper abyss that holds the true message  or meaning behind the work and also expresses the artist’s personal beliefs.

DISCLAIMER – All the information, data and imagery in this blog post is for informational and educational purpose only. Some images and data may have been taken from the links included below and I give full credit to these websites/pages, thereby in no way claiming them to be my own. Other data is based on my personal experiences and opinions.

Sources and Credits –

http://illustrationart.blogspot.com/2011/10/old-question-finally-answered.html

http://www.visual-arts-cork.com/illustration.htm

When your Artwork makes it as a Magazine Cover Page….

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Greetings to all Art Dungeon followers! I have great news!! It gives me great pleasure to share with you all that my artwork titled “et ressurectionis”, that I had shared in one of the earlier posts (https://theartdungeon.blog/2020/10/04/et-ressurectionis/ ), has made it to the cover page of a magazine! How cool is that!!

Here are a few snapshots of the magazine’s with the artwork that extends from the front cover to the back cover as one continuous piece. Also including the original painting and a small write up explaining it that was published in the magazine.

The front and back of the magazine
The front cover
The write up
The original artwork

Do click on the link above to know more about the concept, medium and techniques behind the artwork!

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All done with the Work of Art in Progress!

Hey folks! In continuation with last week’s post titled Work of Art in Progress (https://theartdungeon.blog/2020/10/18/work-of-art-in-progress/), today I will be sharing with you all the completed artwork. I have titled this piece “Painting Nature in its True Colors”.

I have already covered the thought process behind the artwork in detail last week, but just to recap, this painting is based on the theme “Nurturing Nature for a Better Future” and is intended to be the cover page of a magazine. It is my attempt to depict how Mother Nature, like all mothers, keeps showering us and our planet earth with her blessings in abundance and nourishes us unconditionally. But if we don’t look after her, she will eventually get drained out and will have very little or almost nothing to offer to our future generations as well as our planet. Hence, we need to nurture and heal her by painting her with a colorful palette of clean, green lands, water and air, for the future of her child that is, planet earth, depends on it. To delve deeper into the concept behind the artwork, please click on the link above.

The finished artwork titled “Painting Nature in its True Colors

In today’s post, I am going to talk about the technicalities of this artwork. Let’s start with the medium. I have used watercolors, specifically watercolor brush pens for the entire piece, along with a bit of prismacolor pencils here and there, just to enhance those highlights and shadows. I have also made use of a white gel pen to accentuate the lines of the hair locks of Mother Nature that symbolize the wind as well the waves of the sea. The blossoms scattered on the mossy green landscape have also been rendered using the same while gel pen. Apart from this the fiery flame-like locks representing fire too have a touch of white in the form of highlights.

Coming to the technique, I have employed the classic watercolor trick of “wet 0n wet”, wherein the area to be painted is dampened with a wet brush first followed by the application of paint. Most of the painting is done using this technique, but at some places, especially the finer details, I resorted to first applying the color on the dry surface and then going over it with a wet brush.

Hope you like the final product!

Work of Art in Progress

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Greetings from The Art Dungeon! I have been toying with the idea of sharing a work in progress for a long time, but procrastination has always got the better of me. So here I am, finally getting down to it and what could be better than the piece I am working on presently?

Today, I am going to share with you all, the evolutionary process of the artwork I am working on currently. As mentioned earlier, it’s work in progress so bear in mind that I am yet to finish this piece. I believe that the journey is as important as the destination hence it becomes imperative that I give you all a sneak peek into my process. So let’s dive right into it!

This artwork, which is still untitled, is meant to be the cover page of a magazine with the underlying theme, “Nurturing Nature for a Better Future.” I have depicted a personified version of Mother Nature, endowed with all of her classical elements – air (or wind), fire, water, earth and aether (or space) which also explain the complexity of life all around us. These elements are essential for the survival of all living beings and therefore should be respected and protected from any abuse.

Here’s a slide show of images showing my creative process:

I have represented air and fire in the form of the flowing locks of the female form of Mother Nature. The tree bark-like hind limbs, its roots and the vegetation adorning the figure symbolize the earth or land. Water is represented by the surging waves of the sea next to the land and the backdrop of the artwork forms aether or space.

These elements, which form the basis of all living life and matter, are blessings that Mother Nature bestows upon the one and only habitable place we have in the universe – planet earth, depicted in my artwork as the offspring in her womb.  Not only does she nourish and nurture our planet, she cares for us as well, thus making us all her children.

The earth in the womb of Mother Nature symbolizes our future and only if we take care of the mother, can we have a healthy and happy future. Nature is like a refillable prescription that keeps providing to us in abundance and adequacy, just like a mother does to her child. But if we don’t look after her, she will eventually get drained out, consequently affecting our future generations as well as the future of our planet. Hence, we need to nurture and heal her with all that we can for a better tomorrow.

So how do we do it? All we need to do is replenish our planet with greenery, crystal clear waters and clean air. I have depicted this in the form of three human hands representing vegetation, water and wildlife respectively. It is with our very own hands that we can paint our beloved planet with these colors of Mother Nature and make it a better place to live in. For it is air that moves us, fire that transforms us and water that shapes us. Let’s nurture nature for a better future.

Like I said before, this artwork is still in the making and this post is meant to be an insight into the creative process behind it. My next post will hopefully feature the finished piece where I will delve into the technique and medium I have used. Should also have a title for the artwork by then but am open to suggestions, so do share your ideas in the comments sections below! Cheers and watch out for more!!   

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“et ressurectionis”

Hey folks! After a hiatus of two weeks, I am resurfacing with a new post! Finally got a chance to get back to the drawing board after a long long time, so the artwork I am sharing in today’s post not only serves as a comeback to my blog but also to my art!

“et ressurectionis”

I call this one “et ressurectionis”, which is Latin for resurrection. This artwork is once again inspired by the present Covid-ridden scenario that our world is relentlessly fighting day and night. It has been almost a year since we have been in the clutches of this dreaded virus. While we continue our attempts at understanding this miniscule yet powerful entity, it in turn has taught us a lot of valuable lessons, not just physical ones, but also on a spiritual level.

Thanks to the corona virus, mankind has been restrained to the confines of his four-walled dwellings like never before. This alone time, or “Me time” as I like to call it, has given him the opportunity to contemplate and retrospect on what he was, what he has become and what he should actually be. It has given him a chance to delve into the depths of his psyche and confront the real pandemic that has been plaguing mankind for centuries – his own vices, namely anger, violence, greed and his lust for power as well as wealth. Not only is he fighting a deadly biological contagion, but also an intangible one, that is far bigger a threat to the existence of the human race that the organic pathogen itself.

This artwork is a representation of man working towards his long impending goal – to break free from the shackles of his own vices and emerge renewed and victorious not just from the pandemic, but also himself. The blue phoenix in this painting is a personification of mankind reborn after it succeeds in purging the pathosis that’s decomposing his humanity along with the physiological affliction that’s wearing him out physically, for a blue phoenix  is a symbol of rebirth, a return to being, and a new spiritual path.

The phoenix teaches us not just to let go of our old self and our limiting self concepts, but also inspires us to embrace and accept the new us that is abound with all the goodness in the form of virtues that have been listed on the feathers of the phoenix in this artwork.

In times of doubt and confusion, the blue phoenix symbolizes strength, transformation and renewal. For only from the ashes of who we were, can we rise up to become who we are to be. That is how we are rediscovering ourselves as we get past COVID-19.

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Art and Faith

The marriage between religion and art has always been one full of turmoil. There are several instances from the past as well as the present when the most artistic imagery depicting religion has been considered disrespectful or derogatory to the faith in question or has managed to create a scandal. Many artists indulging in religious art are grossly misunderstood when all they want to do is express themselves.  

This compels me to ask the inevitable question – should artists mix art and religion and if they do, should they be left uninhibited, free to explore the realms of religion through their art or should they be sensitive towards matters of faith?

Art has the capability to illustrate and express religious beliefs, customs and values through iconography and body postures. Religious paintings are personal expressions of an artist about religious themes and principles as seen through his eyes. Moreover, aided by their aesthetic skill, artists have improved our understanding of religion. They have succeeded in bringing history to life with their clever manipulation of colors, textures and styles thereby expanding our horizon about past events. Until recently, religion and art were symbiotic, with aspects of the former making up the subject matter of the latter. 

Religious art serves decorative as well as reflective purposes and its main objective is to assert a moral message of the religion it represents.   Not only does it tell the story of a religion as told in its holy scriptures, but also provides an insight into the varying lifestyles of different religious groups.  It helps in keeping religious traditions alive and visualizing religious events from the past. Religious paintings can idealize and glorify a religion and possess the power to make believers out of non believers. 

In my understanding, the harmony between art and religion ceases to exist if it is communalized. When religious art becomes a vehicle for propaganda and serves the selfish motives of fundamentalists and right wing zealots, it loses its aesthetic appeal, leading to criticism and subsequent demand for curbs on artistic expression. The line between expression of and regard for religious beliefs is an extremely thin one.  An artist needs to take care that his portrayal of religion through his work doesn’t hurt anyone’s religious faith and ideology. In order to do so, every artist needs to be open-minded and think beyond religion and politics so that his art spreads positivity.

I am also of the firm belief that if the artist is expected to revere and respect the religious sentiments of people, they in turn too need to view his art with an unprejudiced mind. If art is to achieve its purpose, mutual understanding between its creator and viewer is the key. While trying to be sensitive towards the religious sentiments of his audience, the artist shouldn’t end up curbing his artistic expression for it is he who gives visual narrative to religion and god. 

In my opinion, one must first appreciate religious art solely for its creative genius before cross analyzing its objective. While each viewer will have his or her own perspective and draw his or her own inferences from it, they must also make an attempt to see it through the artist’s eyes, without being judgmental. Religious art is the external expression of the artist’s personal vision. What the artist depicts is a rendition of his own belief and faith and a projection of the world around him from his point of view, without any intention of offending others. I believe he deserves to be appreciated for his shear artistic genius, regardless of the subject matter.

I am convinced that as an artist, while I should have the liberty to portray religion through my work, I also need to practice self constraint to some extent so that my work doesn’t hurt anybody’s religious sentiments.

What’s do you think? Do you think artists should be given the luxury to explore religion as they wish? Or should they restrain from mixing the two? I leave this post open to you all and would love to hear your point of view so do share your opinion in the comments sections below. If I get enough feedback, my next post will hopefully be a compilation of all the views I get. So fire away!!